Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against

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Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against Empty Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against

Post  Elanor on Wed Jun 22, 2011 1:19 am

Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against

This topic serves as an archive of a thread from the Harry Potter Lexicon Forum as hosted on World Crossing which ceased operation on April 15, 2011. Elanor

W J - Nov 16, 2003 8:34 pm
Edited by Kip Carter Jan 12, 2006 11:23 pm
In the past, we have argued about whether or not Snape is a Vampire. Here are the main points that were made prior to August of 2003:
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Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against Empty Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against - Part 1

Post  Elanor on Wed Jun 22, 2011 1:21 am

Part 1

Zachary Gulledge - Oct 17, 2002 6:57 am
Does anyone else think it is possible that Snape is a vampire?
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Slytherin Prefect - Oct 17, 2002 7:58 am (#2 of 216)
No way Snape's a vampire. Consider the following:
1. Quirrel had garlic all over his office, and wore some. Yet Snape on several occasions got close enough to be in his face threatening him at any sign of betrayal.

2. Snape is outdoors in the daylight quite often. For example, in book one when he referees the Quidditch match. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Joa Pendragen - Oct 17, 2002 12:50 pm (#10 of 216)
[Fantastic Beasts says]: It says that Vampires are Beings. Since Vela and Giants arn't classified as Beasts, and they clearly arn't ghosts, it's safe to say they are beings. Beings, however, are worthy of rights and a voice in the goverment(ministry-whatever)They aren't entitled to a wand. I thought I read somewhere that only wizards are allowed to have wands. Maybe PoA? Oh, and one more thing. Bram Stoker(Stocker?)invented the thing about Vampires dying in sunlight. Snape(if he is a vampire) would be totaly safe in the sun. But he would need blood. How would he get it?
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MDK Heart Attack - Oct 17, 2002 3:58 pm (#14 of 216)
In the Snape's Grudge chapter, Neville mentions working with Harry on the Vampire essay Lupin had assigned over the Christmas break, which was almost right after Snape assigned the essay on Werewolves... Humm! And who's to say Snape isn't half Vampire? Or maybe he makes a potion for himself to supress Vampirical qualities, as he makes a potion to supress Lupin's Werewolfin' tendencies.
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Zachary Gulledge - Oct 17, 2002 7:33 pm (#15 of 216)
On page 566 of GoF,

Ron asks Harry "Do you reckon (Snape) could of beaten you and Dumbledore there?". Harry replies, "Not unless he can turn himself into a bat or something."

Ron then says, "Wouldn't put it past him."

On page 277 of PoA, when Neville and Harry are talking about the Vampire essay, Snape walks up and tells them to return to their tower. Lupin gives the students the Vampire essay right after Snape gives them the werewolf essay.

You never here anything mentioned about Snape's shadow in any of the books. Quirrell had all of the garlic in his room and he was terrified of Snape. Also, JK always writes that Snape "glided" over the desk, or "swept" down the stairs. Snape never just walks anywhere.

There is a very strange atmosphere about this guy and I am convinced that he is a vampire, half vampire or something of that sort. And, about only wizards being able to use wands, Hagrid and Fleur both have wands being half giant and half Veela so why couldn't someone half vampire have one?(all of my page numbers were from the US version of the book)
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Chocolatelatte - Oct 17, 2002 7:40 pm (#16 of 216)
Vampires get mentioned unusually often. In PoA, after Lupin resigned, Seamus Finnigan wondered, "...What'll they give us next year?" Dean Thomas suggested (hopefully, I might add): "Maybe a vampire."

Not to mention the blood-flavored lollipops under "Unusual Tastes." Hermione: (parr.) "I expect they're for vampires."
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Oct 17, 2002 8:00 pm (#17 of 216)
Bram Stoker did NOT invent the sunlight thing. In fact he said vampires COULD go in sunlight. Dracula did. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ravenclaw Owl - Oct 18, 2002 3:05 pm (#34 of 216)
Vampires can definitely NOT come out during the day. The original mythos of Vampires noted that a stake thru the heart didn't necessarily kill a vampire, the stake (and why it's a STAKE, not just any wodden implement) was used to anchor the dead to the ground to keep them in place till sunrise at which point they would be destroyed. (most things are less scary in the daytime ^_-) That said, considering sunscreen and all that, (and the fact that it IS all fantasy anyway) no reason to assume that a "half-vampire" should one exist can't come out in the daytime, or at least that if Snape were one that he couldn't devise a way. Maybe he's just an animagus that turns into a bat, but not an outright vampire. ^_^
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Oct 18, 2002 3:09 pm (#35 of 216)
Well, it depends on the myth. See, not all vampires feed off blood. In fact a lot of them don't. Rather they feed off of spiritual and sexual energy.

Vampires can feed on animal blood/energy. In fact many myths state that when "a good milking cow goes dry there's a vampire about." Meaning that vampires drain the cow of the power to make milk. Also their presence withers crops and causes poltergist activity.

I'm sure about the daylight thing. I've read a number of myths - a LOT - and only one has a vampire in the daytime. [Dracula by Bram Stoker]

Blade, BTW, is a Dhampire. A child born of the union between a vampire male and mortal female. (Not like the movie, mind you.) A Dhampire actually does NOT have the vampire thirst. They just have the ability to sense vampires and know instinctively where they sleep during the day.

There are also many ways to become a vampire - Be bitten by one (duh)- Sell your soul to Satan - Die a werewolf - Die a witch - Die unbaptised - Commit murder - Be murdered - Commit suicide - Be a redhead (this only applies to lands were redheads are rare) - Be the 7th son of a 7th son

Ravenclaw Owl, The stake has to be either oak or ash or made out of a thorn bearing plant. (In fact a lot of the vampire killing methods deal with thorns.)

If you chose the stake method you must then remove the vampire's head and bury it seperate from the body. Usually under the feet or under the butt. Because the vampire could find the head and re-attach it.

Otherways to kill a vampire -

An iron spike thru the head or heart. Cold iron was believed to be poisonous to vampires and other supernatural creatures like witches and fairies.

A thorn thru the heart.

A thorn used to pin the tongue to the roof of the mouth - the vampire would be unable to feed and starve to death.

Decaptitation.

Burning.

Sunlight.

Silver can kill them too, especially if blessed by a priest.

A branch of wild rose tossed on the vampire's grave - they would be unable to get past the thorns and starve to death.

Also there's a cure if you're bitten - you kill the vampire and mix their blood with dirt from their grave. If you eat it you will not become a vampire when you die.
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Ravenclaw Owl - Oct 18, 2002 4:37 pm (#42 of 216)
Some historians have traced the Vampire mythos back quite a ways (I think there is Egyptian myth on the topic to BC time). Basically, "back in the day" it was used to explain mysterious illnesses (like the black plague) and most of the things like crosses and holy water didn't enter into it until the crusade/inquisition type era. Not that it REALLY matters all things considered, Rowling could be using any number of Vampire myths combined or separate for her version, so "early" versions don't necessarily matter much. But needless to say, I DOUBT she'd have latched on some esoteric variation where sunlight is ineffective, at least not for her "base". Again, she could add some wacky modification for a "halfer" or there's magic for everything else, no reason a Vampire couldn't use magic to protect from sunlight or what have you. Based on some of the more recent mythos, it would also lend to another layer of "antipathy" between Lupin and Snape. ^_^
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Kip Carter - Oct 18, 2002 6:47 pm (#45 of 216)
Maybe I missed it in the 44 previous posts, but I do feel that we are overlooking something.

Dumbledore has complete confidence in Snape. Dumbledore is an all-knowing headmaster who believes that all should be given a chance. Snape is a Potions Master (even Lupin acknowledges that!). Dumbledore has kept Snape in Potions where Snape has a well-stocked lab.

Snape could be part Vampire and has developed a potion to control his urges much similar to the potion given to Lupin. Maybe Dumbledore feels that keeping Snape in Potions is best because if Snape became the DADA teacher, he may not have access to the potion supplies if another potions teacher was hired. This could cause problems.

[Post #47] I believe that Snape exploited the fact that Lupin is a werewolf because of his extreme hurt from the previous night's happenings when he went from a "Order of Merlin" recipient to "Fellow seems quite unbalanced" within a few minutes.

Snape is a true Slytherin and will use all means to succeed. Rights are not a part of Snape's equation in being successful. Harry and the rest of the Gryffindors are proof that Snape considers anyone's rights. The others involved saw no reason to play "tit-for-tat" with Snape being it could possibly cause more problems than good. That's my feelings!

However, I never said that Snape is a Vampire. Just something to think about! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W J - Oct 19, 2002 12:20 pm (#51 of 216)
I do think there are clues, as I said earlier that he may be a vampire. At this point I will only concede it is a possibility because I am not fully convinced.

Snape IS a potions expert and he is proud of it and he would be the one to know if there were ways to prevent some of the vampire symptoms or problems, just like he knew what would help Lupin with his werewolf symptoms. So he could possibly get around the sunlight problem.

But, he eats and drinks normal food along with everyone else at meals. They all see him eat like everyone else, so blood drinking doesn't seem to be an issue.
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Kevin YouBustSlug - Oct 19, 2002 12:40 pm (#52 of 216)
One reason that I don't think that Snape is a vampire is that he would have no reason to get his nose bent out of shape over the fact that the school had hired a werewolf if he were. He would not have had the students write an essay on how to recognize a werewolf in his attempt to "out" Lupin lest Lupin or some other teacher have the students write an essay on how to recognize a vampire in an attempt to "out" Snape.
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Oct 19, 2002 12:43 pm (#53 of 216)
But Snape hated Lupin as a child and still hates him as an adult. So he'd still want to out him.

And are we so sure Snape eats and it's not just an illustion? Or maybe that's not really even food. Only the house Elves and Dumbledore know for sure that what's on Snape's plate is really food or just frozen blood disguised as food.
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W J - Oct 25, 2002 11:23 pm (#69 of 216)
Hey, I found this essay on whether or not Snape is a vampire. The clincher is the picture that JKR herself drew. Are JKR portraits of her characters canon?

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
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Highlander1592uk - Oct 26, 2002 8:50 am (#70 of 216)
I would say that they are canon. Infact, anything that comes directly from her has to be canon.
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Crookshanks - Nov 21, 2002 8:45 pm (#80 of 216)
Interesting in CoS:

Pg 193 (softcover)during The Dueling Club

"A bad idea, Professor Lockhart," said Snape, gliding over like a large and malevolent bat. "Longbottom causes devastation with the simplest...."

I think that's a pretty good hint that he might be a vampire. There are multiple references in the HP series about Snape and bats.
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Kathy Lynch - Nov 22, 2002 7:59 am (#83 of 216)
You know what i thought today? Snape COULD be a Vampire and JKR could know it, but never tell us. She's said she's got notebooks full of details that are just for her. That could be something that she's keeping hidden, because SNAPE is keeping it hidden. I don't know, just a thought.
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Marie E. - Nov 24, 2002 6:42 pm (#92 of 216)
I mentioned this in the chat room and thought it could also go here. Have any of you seen the Lego version of snape? Very vampire-looking!
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Daniel Turn - Nov 26, 2002 7:04 pm (#93 of 216)
Not to sound aloof, but none of you are thinking this through.

When Dumbledore and co. broke into Crouch/Moodies office at the end Snape inspected his reflection in the mirror. I'm not entirely sure how Foe-Glasses work, but generally vampires don't throw reflections.

Next is the fact that during (I believe) PoA, Ron and Harry are sneaking outside under the Invisibility Cloak they pass Snape. Ron stubbs his toe and swears. Snape sneezes and that drowns out Ron's swear. I don't think vampires sneaze.

Lastly (and this is probably the weakest) during the first book Snape has a run-in with Fluffy and has his leg mauled. I think that he then has it splinted. Splints have wooden parts and vampires are allergic to wood. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NoVeil4Me - Nov 26, 2002 7:07 pm (#94 of 216)
Who says vampires in JKR's world behave like classic vampires? Wink Snape could be one and be able to do all you have said was impossible for a vampire. We just don't know.
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IversonGodfrey - Nov 26, 2002 7:37 pm (#98 of 216)
Daniel Turn- Maybe Snape was inspecting his reflection in the foe glass because he was suprised to see it.
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W J - Nov 26, 2002 9:50 pm (#103 of 216)
Snape is the Potions Master. He created a potion to prevent some of the werewolf problems for Lupin, so why couldn't he create a potion to help himself if he is a vampire?
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Rob - Nov 27, 2002 11:44 pm (#106 of 216)
Just recently re-read this in POA and had to post because I remembered this thread...actually got out of bed for this, so here goes...

1. Lupin shows up as the new DADA teacher, which upsets Snape to no end considering their past.

2. Lupin and his two friends try to entice Snape into getting bit by Lupin when he's a werewolf. James Potter finds out about it at the last minute and saves Snape's life. Snape just assumed that James had an attack of concious and warned him about it; ergo, he blames Harry since James is now dead.

3. The first time Lupin is out because of the full moon, Snape takes over the DADA class and assigns an essay on werewolves, throwing a huge hint to the thick-headed students in his class (hey, I was a thick-headed reader because I didn't guess it until the end) that their teacher was, in fact, a werewolf. He does this believing that his (Snape) secret is still a secret (I'll explain later in this post).

4. Harry gets caught coming back from Hogsmeade by Snape and ushered into his office. After nearly foaming at the mouth at Harry and trying to provoke him, he calls Lupin into his office to talk about the map. Lupin clearly dismisses it and invites Ron and Harry to take a walk with him to "discuss the vampire essay". At this moment, we hear no protest from Snape about Harry sneaking into Hogsmeade and the obvious clues (the chocolates in his pockets, his dirty hands, lack of an alibi, etc.).

5. For the rest of the book, Snape backs off into a corner until the moment comes in which he holds all the cards, so to speak, when he uses Harry's invisibility cloak and sneaks into the haunted house.

Now, here's the theory. Snape was a death-eater for Voldemort. Perhaps Voldemort required some show of loyalty from Snape and told him he had to become a vampire (it's a stretch, I know). Snape, who is a proud individual, remembers his childhood and the way he almost became a werewolf as a result of a prank. Deciding that nobody would dictate to him about who or what he's supposed to be, this is when he became a spy for Dumbledore, out of hatred for Voldemort for demanding such type of loyalty.

So, my theory is that Snape is part vampire, part human, and that is the secret that both he and Dumbledore share together (maybe Dumbledore was able to freeze the transformation process). As we all know, Dumbledore has a habit of taking in those who would not have been accepted elsewhere, such as Hagrid (disgraced when he was thrown out of Hogwarts), Quirill (changed after an attack by vampires), Lockhart (because no one else could stand him), Lupin (because he's a werewolf), Mad-Eye (because no one could stand him), and the list goes on. Snape stays with Dumbledore because of what he did for him and out of hatred for Voldemort for what he's done to Snape (and for self-preservation purposes, that Dumbledore could "out" him to the world at any minute).

Snape is good at potion making. Now we know why.
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W J - Nov 28, 2002 1:06 am (#107 of 216)
Well Vampires are 'immortal' so maybe Voldemort was experimenting with becoming a half vampire since he was so intent on living forever. Good theory, Rob.
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NoVeil4Me - Nov 28, 2002 10:07 am (#110 of 216)
Again, who is to say that JKR's vampires have anything in common with traditional, Dracula type vampires. I have read other works of fiction involving both vampires and lycanthropes, the basics are the same but then specifics vary by author. Some vampires can go out in sunlight, some stay up during the day, some can drink animal blood etc. I would not discount Snape being a vampire or not based on traditional ideas of vampires.
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Asktqa - Nov 29, 2002 6:21 am (#112 of 216)
She'd have to use some traditional ideas about vampires, though, otherwise what makes him a vampire? And Snape got injured in #1 and was limping for ages - I thought vampires, being undead, after all, could heal themselves very quickly unless they were injured with wood.
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Nov 29, 2002 11:07 am (#113 of 216)
It all depends on the myths.

First of all, let me point out that the original myths have vampires able to transform into any animal - from foxes to tigers - and mist. However bats weren't included until people started exploring and came across vampire bats. So yes, that DID come in BEFORE Bram Stoker wrote Dracula. Not because of Dracula.

In some myths vampires are nothing more then rotting corpses, so you can injure them and they won't heal. They don't were gothic clothing, they wear what they were burried in. In other myths they're just walking bags of skin animated by Satan and filled with blood. Actually it's only in the Dracula book that they heal faster. In the myths they sometimes never healed of their wounds.

And if Snape is only a half vampire, aka Dhampire, he would heal at a normal human rate and age about half as fast as a normal human.
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Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against Empty Is Snape a Vampire? Condensed Arguments For and Against - Part 2

Post  Elanor on Wed Jun 22, 2011 1:21 am

Part 2

Sly Girl - Dec 11, 2002 5:33 am (#119 of 216)
okay so this has been bugging me (I slept on it, you might say) and I have been re-reading PoA and my copy doesn't have the bit about the vampire essay! Unless I'm thinking of another part- my book has Lupin mentioning it in passing to get Harry and Ron out of Snape's office after Harry gets caught.Is there a part where we hear Lupin actually assign such an essay?
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yolanda collins - Dec 11, 2002 7:05 am (#121 of 216)
The Vampire Essay was not assigned to the class, true. But it wasn't said in passing entirely either. Lupin said it casually to Snape for a reason and what did Snape do? He backed off Harry about having gone to Hogsmede when he certainly wasn't allowed. The essay mentioned in "passing" was more like a quiet but deadly threat. When one takes in consideration the possibility that Snape might be a Vampire the "quiet threat" theory holds water.
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Sly Girl - Dec 11, 2002 9:59 am (#122 of 216)
Lupin isn't the first one to mention the Vampire Essay, actually- it's Neville, right before Harry gets almost-busted by Snape (the first time). Neville says he doesn't understand what they do with the garlic... (could that be another clue, dear me) I still don't think Lupin used it as a threat, I guess is my point. And he doesn't say it directly to Snape, he just says it within ear shot. Which again creates the question of why...
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Diagon Nilly - Dec 14, 2002 12:45 pm (#125 of 216)
At first, I thought this wouldn't be true because, as stated above, Snape is seen in daylight during the quidditch matches. So, he can't be a vampire, right? Hold on tho', if Snape posseses the ability to make a potion that would allow a werewolf to keep a human mindframe during a full moon, then why wouldn't Snape be able to make himself a potion that would protect his skin in sunlight?

Ah, the mystery deepens.
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Dec 14, 2002 1:01 pm (#126 of 216)
In fact that could be why he has a shallow, greasy appearence. That could be from whatever ointment he puts all over himself to protect himself from sunlight.
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Elgin Potter - Dec 15, 2002 9:16 pm (#129 of 216)
Of course Snape is a vampire! Don't believe me?

1) There are many references to him as a bat. In book 1 he's described as, "An overgrown bat", in Book 4 Ron says, "Unless he's a bat, I don't see how he'd get down there…" etc.

2) He's VERY intuitive. Vampires are meant to be so. They're often associated with knowing what you feel and almost reading you mind...This is a very Snapeque characteristic.

3) He looks like one. Pure and Simple. Just look at his clothes. His black cloak, his hollow eyes, pale skin… It's all there… His thiness, his gaunt cheeks, his hypnotic presence, his ability to captivate a class effortlessly… Vampires are often associated with black cloaks…and his cloak seems to be an important feature to his appearance. Even things such as being different and the outsider. Lonesome and solitairy

4) In Book 3, Snape set his essay on werewolves, so people would be able to discover he was a werewolf. Lupin set a Vampire essay directly afterwards. Not just an essay or a piece of homework…but a vampire essay. Coincidentally, the moment Neville and Harry are talking about the vampire essay, Snape looms up behind them and interrupts their little conversation. Lupin also made the effort to purposely mention the Vampire essay in front of Snape (when he was telling off Harry for the map). Could this be in retaliation to the Werewolf essay..? I doubt JKR did it for no reason...*grins*

5) He's not often depicted as enjoying eating normal food. JKR makes a special point of introducing us to vampires in her world when she shows us the unusual blood-flavored lollipops in the sweet shop. At the very least, given her predilection for logical storytelling, this shows that a vampire will at some time be important in the story. And no one, so far, would make a better vampire than Snape. It also shows that vampires are legally tailored for by the wizarding community.

6) He doesn't go out in the light much and works in the dark dungeons.

7) This would also be a good reason for Snape to hate Lockhart --as the man built his reputation as a monster-hunter.

Cool It might be a stretch, but look at JKR's use of names. Professor Lupin was a werewolf. The scientific name for a wolf is lupine. Snape's name is far less scientific, but Snape does sound a bit like "nape." Nape of the neck? Perfect for biting. Smile

9) Alan Rickman played Snape in a very vampiresque and bat-like manner. He places each hand on opposite shoulders to cross his chest. JKR told Rickman a bit of detail about him. If she told him that he was a vampire, he certainly used the detail well.

In the Invisibility cloak scene when Harry is in the invisibilty cloak, Snape does not need any vision to sense Harry's direction and presence. This sensed from only a few breaths. It is highly intuitive if you happen to be threatening a man at the same time!

She also keeps on mentioning vampires in the story, but as of yet, we have not met an open one. We've met werewolves, giants, trolls, dragons…But we haven't yet met a vampire Wink

Immediately someone says in retaliation: But how can he be a Vampire? We've seen him outside!

Not ALL vampires are the same. The daylight beaten, blood-sucking vampire is a stereotype.There are many different types. Anyway, he's the Potions Master, it wouldn't be surprising if he could whip up a potion or two to help him with difficulties. Another theory is that the reason why he has greasy hair and sallow skin is because he rubs ointment on himself to stop him from burning in the sun. As Potions Master, he could do a very good job disguising/controlling his vampiric nature. Then again, perhaps his skill at potions is the result of his trying to research a cure? Not all wizards are up to making concoctions such as the Wolfsbane potion. Perhaps the reason why Snape is so skilled at making potions such as that, is because he is used to making them, except for himself.

JKR herself claims that 95% of the magic she uses is made up by herself and twists folklore to suit her plot.

Sorry about the length but I hope I proved my point. Smile
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T. Armstrong - Dec 16, 2002 9:55 am (#132 of 216)
The only thing that bothers me is a passage in PoA. Harry sees a picture of Sirius Black and compared Black to all the pictures he'd seen of vampires in his DADA classes. If Snape is a vampire, he certainly doesn't look anything like the ones described in Harry's books. Harry never suspects him of it. Aside from that, I love the way Rowling hints at the fact throughout the series.
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Grindylow - Dec 16, 2002 10:05 pm (#134 of 216)
Slytherins don't tend to be particularly fond of those who are not pure blood. If Snape had some vampire blood in him, how would he be able to become head of Slytherin without heaps of complaints?
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Dec 16, 2002 10:23 pm (#135 of 216)
No one would know. After all, Voldermort's a half-blood and he was in Slytherin.
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Cinnamon - Dec 23, 2002 7:05 am (#146 of 216)
Neville’s question about vampires on page 277 of PA, “I don’t understand that thing about garlic at all – do they have to eat it, or…” and Snape shows up. Quirrel’s turban was said to be stuffed with garlic. Quirrel had supposedly had a “run-in with a vampire and was never the same”, if Snape was one, he would have known this was not true b/c of (unknown by me) false details Quirrel gave, and would have seen through him.

The best authors, in my experience, NEVER waste page space, especially in children’s/Young adult fiction. Every line is checked, editited and checked again. Because authors usually have a page limit imposed by publishers or by self, nothing is included that does not directly contribute to the plot. Thus, while a line like the blood-lollipops (PA, 197) may seem pointless at the time, it WILL work into the plot later. Have you ever known Rowling to put in anything clumsy or pointless? She has been known to go back after the books have been published and edit out even very minor inconsistencies.

‘Snape's name is far less scientific, but Snape does sound a bit like "nape."’ – Lupin’s first name is Remus, after one of the legendary founders of Rome, whose twin brother was Romulus. They were abandoned by a river as infants and raised by a she-wolf. When they were grown, Romulus was also said to have murdered Remus over a disagreement. Therefore, first names must also be taken into account. Going with the latin roots, Severus is stern, or harsh, but to me, it just sounds like sever, or “to sever (cut). “To snape someone means to rebuke or hurt them, and a snape is a rebuke.” I do agree that Snape sounds like nape tho, JKR prolly has multiple reasons all the names. She’s given herself a bit of liscense, b/c Lupin was not born a werewolf, yet he is named for one.

Resources: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

Someone on another board suggested he was a “Psychic vampire” – one who feeds off of emotions, not blood.
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Cinnamon - Dec 25, 2002 1:14 am (#156 of 216)
Found something. In PA, 285, "a terrible grin twisting his face" and "Snape's uneven, yellowish teeth were bared." This is the scene where he catches Harry coming out from behind the one-eyed witch statue. Since he spent half of this scene up in Harry's face, Harry could hardly have missed it if he did have fangs. So he doesn't have fangs unless he makes them invisible or other complicated tricks... you can tell I really want him to be a vampire, yes? Truly tho, I still think he is, and am holding to my JKR-as-"Great Writer" theory. I'm starting to think he's actually a psychic vampire or some variation Rowling has come up with.
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Diagon Nilly - Dec 25, 2002 5:39 am (#157 of 216)
Hmmm, was it "Interview with the Vampire" or "Bram Stoker's Dracula" where their fangs were only bared when they were about to feed? Either way, perhaps if Snape IS a vamp, he only has fangs when feeding.
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Dec 25, 2002 1:19 pm (#159 of 216)
In pretty much all books the fangs only come out while feeding. They call them blood teeth usually. And Snape could still be a vampire or dhampire. :-P
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Sirius Slytherin - Jan 9, 2003 8:42 pm (#163 of 216)
I haven't read all of the posts in this thread, but a majority of them. As to the mythology of vampires, there was an episode of the X-Files (probably its funniest IMO) regarding vampires and in it, Mulder claims something along the lines that there are a ton of vampiric-like creatures in various cultures, including ancient Egypt as one person here mentioned. However, he also stated that the one thing that unifies all concepts of vampires throughout the numerous mythologies isn't fear of sunlight or sucking blood or energy of some sort, but that they're all, get this, pedantic. In essence, they're neat freaks. If they see something messy, they are obligated to clean it up or to put it in proper order due to their vampiric natures. Does that sound like a certain Potions master to any of you? He's about as much of a neat freak in the HP saga as anyone, Filch included.
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Jami JoAnne Russell - Jan 9, 2003 9:05 pm (#164 of 216)
Not so much neat freaks as math/puzzle lovers. They see scattered grain, they have to count it, they see a knotted rope, they have to untie it, they see a puzzle, they have to finish it.
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Caput Draconis - Jan 9, 2003 9:11 pm (#165 of 216)
Ah, now that sounds more Snapey. His philosophers stone obstacle required logic, not magic to solve. Plus the very nature of potions is exactness, didn't he say something like 'there's no silly wand waving in my class?' Maybe that was just the movie.
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vdobbs - Jan 9, 2003 9:30 pm (#166 of 216)
As a chemistry teacher (kind of like potions) I know I want my stuff in order so I can find everything. There is a system to storing chemicals. I feel that there would be a system to potions. Snape's neatness may just be due to being the potions teacher.
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Sirius Slytherin - Jan 10, 2003 4:03 am (#167 of 216)
Doh! Jami Jo, that's what I was going for with my post. You have to admit that it seems really pedantic, which would fit Snape perfectly. Either way, that aspect of his personality fits him quite well and could further the point that Snape is a vampire.

However, what does him being a vampire have to do with anything? Lupin being a werewolf has, so far, only shunned him from the world and further displayed the bond he had with the the Marauders. What reprecussions could come of Snape being a vampire/dhampire? Could it be that Dumbledore wanted him to ally vampires with his side? Vampires are categorically evil (not all, but they're stereotyped that way) so maybe if one of their own were to convert them over they could fight alongside the good guys versus Voldemort. Hell, I dunno where I'm going with this...
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Sirius Slytherin - Jan 11, 2003 8:35 pm (#169 of 216)
Here's a recent theory I came up with, and it entails Snape being a vampire (it's not necessary, but it would tie in other things). Here goes...

Snape betrayed Voldemort and gained Dumbledore's trust by killing the mystery Death Eater. What would be more indicative of leaving a group than to kill one of its members? However, one can go on about how maybe the other person was the one who was going to betray Voldie and that Snape killed him just in time, but was framed as the traitor, blah blah blah. That's another matter altogether. Anyway, back on to the theory, Voldie isn't exactly sure that Snape killed the mystery DE, so that's why he says "believe". What I'm thinking is that Snape killed said DE via ecsanguination (maybe he was killing 2 birds, his satiating for blood and the DE, with one bite...yes, I know that was lame >_<), and that by doing so, he obviously transferred some of the victim's blood into his own. By doing so, maybe he gained some powers or knowledge (I dunno, I'm just making this up on the fly), and he told Dumbledore that by transferring blood with another wizard, he gained said powers or whatever else it could be. After Harry told Dumbledore that Voldy took his blood, he got that gleam in his eye because of the information Severus had given him in regards to 2 beings sharing similar blood, knowing that Harry would gain something from Voldy having part of his blood (maybe some sort of protection?). Therefore, the relevance of Snape being a vampire/dhampire would bear great importance in the grand scheme of the plot, and knowing how JKR works, she wouldn't leave something like Snape's being a vampire/dhampire as an innocuous sidenote to the story. My theory, albeit premature, would tie in many things. I could be totally off with this, of course, and it wouldn't surprise me one bit. *shrugs* Just a thought...
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Sly Girl - Jan 12, 2003 9:00 am (#170 of 216)
I don't know. I'd always assumed that whatever it is between Dumbledore and Snape that it had something to *do* between them and between them alone. Meaning, either Dumbledore saved Snape from something or Snape finally came to realize that good (ie Dumbledore) was the stronger power (this based on something he had seen Dumbledore do) and that Voldemort would eventually be defeated. I don't see Snape killing a DE as being all that... big a secret. And I don't know about the blood transference thing. Wouldn't that be something Dumbledore would know about already? And I don't think Snape shows any special powers other than being really good at potions and basic wizarding. And if Snape was a vampire wouldn't he have been sucking blood about for awhile now? So therefore the blood transference wouldn't of had to come about with a DE, it would of taken place the first time Snape ever sucked blood.
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Sirius Slytherin - Jan 12, 2003 7:23 pm (#171 of 216)
Well, let's say he were a vampire/dhampir. By joining the DE, he would always have victims whose blood he could take. That's obviously one plus from joining the DE, which we know he was a part of.

As to the Dumbledore being ignorant about blood-transfusion, maybe he just doesn't know vampiric tendencies. He does have a lot of thoughts swirling in his head (plus he's quite old), and he may have just skipped past that. Hell if I know, just a little theory to throw out there. If Snape does in fact turn out being a vampire/dhampire, JKR would surely put that to some use and there's always the plausibility of what I threw it there...I think. *shrugs*
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Olivia Wood - Feb 22, 2003 9:14 pm (#178 of 216)
What doesn't fit is Sirius' picture being compared to a Vampire in PoA. Also, at the end of said book, Snape actually does reveal that Lupin is a warewolf. Why would he do this? Wouldn't he be afraid that Lupin would tell everyone he was a Vampire?
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Patience - Apr 23, 2003 7:41 am (#191 of 216)
Now, let’s examine vampires a bit. The only things we know for sure from that books are that A) They have a taste for blood (blood-flavored lollipops) and B) They are believed to have a weakness for garlic (according to Quirrell and Neville). Everything else is an abstract reference. It’s puzzling why we don’t learn much about them. Maybe Vampires are as confusing in the wizard world as they are in the real world and no one can agree on them. That would explain why they were covered 3 years in a row in DADA -- Quirrell, Lockhart (I’m not sure when, but I believe they came up here), and Lupin all talked about Vampires, after all. That’s a lot of learning on one creature. It’s very likely that there’s a lot of controversy on how to deal with a vampire, and each teacher taught a different theory. One of the vampire stereotypes is secretiveness, after all. It makes sense that they would guard their weaknesses well and spread false rumors. So, by the seventh book, we may get a traditional vampire, but have it turn out that garlic isn’t really a weakness for vampires, and that neither is sunlight. So we can explain ANY inconsistencies in this theory away as misinformation. Or we can simply assume for the sake of argument that JKR is going Modern Vampire Legend. She went with Modern Werewolf Legend, after all, for Lupin. Now, with that settled, we can go issue by issue.

The Essay - Lupin’s specialty in DADA seems to be the creature feature. So, if anyone can spot a vampire, it would be him. Without saying Snape is or isn’t a vampire, this can tell us that Lupin suspects he is one but is unable to get convincing proof that he is. This would explain why he assigned the essay and used it as a threat, and why Snape backed off until he had the upper hand (not necessarily because he is a vampire, but because even the rumor can cause a lot of trouble). It also explains why no retaliation came when Snape dropped the Werewolf secret, because Lupin had no hard evidence to back up his claim.

If Lupin doesn’t think Snape’s a vampire, it still doesn’t mean an essay is just an essay. There still might be a secret meaning to “Vampire” between Snape and Lupin. I don’t mean it’s a code word, but Lupin may have mentioned Vampires in order to remind Snape of something else - as a way of warning or chastising him. Maybe someone they both knew was killed because he was falsely accused of being one, for instance. Maybe Snape ran into trouble because he was falsely accused of being one. Maybe Snape inadvertently caused someone to become one. This clue doesn’t mean he IS a vampire, but it does make it likely he’s had run-ins with one.

There’s a chance it was just a joke. Snape spent all year making verbal shots at Lupin, and Lupin couldn’t resist a retort about Snape’s predatory habits. Lupin may have even been trying for a little revenge for the Werewolf essay. Can you imagine how annoying having that rumor around school could be? I’ll bet there’s more than a few muggle-born Anne Rice fan girls in Snape’s classes that could drive him crazy. It’s an easily disproven claim even if it does get out of hand, so no harm done with this prank. And Lupin can talk his way out of it with “Vampires are part of the curriculum, just like werewolves. I couldn’t NOT teach them or else they’d think there was a conspiracy.”

Garlic - Snape is good with regular poisons, why not what’s poisonous to a Vampire? He would have a way around this one.

The Foe-Glass - This one incident can argue for or against the V-Theory. True, vampires aren’t supposed to have reflections or shadows. But the fact that it’s a magical glass can easily explain why he has a reflection. In which case his reaction is very telltale. Think about it, there’s a villain on the floor, Harry’s injured, Dumbledore’s angry, McGongall’s about to break down, there’s a million unanswered questions, but Snape finds the mirror the most interesting thing in the room. Possible explanations here: He was surprised to see his reflection; he’d never seen a Foe-Glass before and was wondering why it had the images it did on it; he liked it and wanted to call dibs; or he had simply turned away from Harry to hide his reaction to the scene and the Foe-Glass was what he was facing.

Bat references - are good characterizations, not a clincher. Maybe JKR is paralleling Snape to Bruce Wayne.

Intuition - Could be just intelligence and Harry finds it supernatural because he doesn’t want to give Snape that much credit. Snape could also have potions for mindreading, and heightened senses. That scene in the PS/SS Movie doesn’t mean that, even. Dumbledore can see through Invisibility Cloaks, maybe he was trying to teach Snape the same trick but he hasn’t quite caught on yet.

Appearance, Voice, Preference for Dungeons, Odd Waking Hours (we’ve seen him in his pajamas at night ONCE in 4 years - and he was cranky and easily awakened; the rest of the time he’s just been up and about like it’s his normal schedule), Predatory body language (Rickman’s acting; a tendency to bare his teeth when angry; no touching unless in a threatening manner)- These do not a vampire make. But they do lend credence to two other theories:

1) Snape is not a Vampire or a Dhampir himself, but vampires raised him. Take Sirius, Lupin, and even Dumbledore’s descriptions of Young Snape, add his way of relating to children, what we know of his past (joined a Death Cult bent on world domination) and his current emotional state. This equals one really, really interesting homelife as a child. One or both of his parents could have become one after his birth; he may have been kidnapped or just found by a group of them as a child; OR he may have had an overbearing “Grandparent,” “Uncle,” or “Aunt” who always glossed over silly questions like “Why do you sleep during the day in a box instead of at night in a bed?” and “Why does Mommy wear a scarf since you came to visit?” Growing up in a cold dark place would make for a pale child who preferred the dungeons to the playground and couldn’t sleep at night. His voice and body language would be from him mimicking his elders.

For a more detailed post, which links to yet another more detailed post at yet another site (Easier that typing that all out, and cut and paste feels like cheating), take a look at: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] -- And for a much more detailed (but closed) discussion on the same topic, try: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] -- Be careful though, you might spend a whole Saturday afternoon reading on these sites like I did.

2) There's a lot of talk on this thread about JKR misleading us, but what about Snape himself? Isn't it possibel that he's putting forth an elaborate act to make others think that he is a vampire. I mean, this is the guy who double-crossed Voldemort and lived to keep quiet about it. I imagine he's capable of such a ruse. I think Snape may be dropping these clues himself in order to draw attention away from something worse. That way whenever someone starts to look too closely at him, they draw the inevitable (and easily disproven!) conclusion, and become a laughing stock. What he might be trying to draw attention away from, I don't know. But, it's a possibility.
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Olivia Wood - Apr 23, 2003 4:29 pm (#196 of 216)
The foe-glass detail struck me as odd, but I didn't make the connection. I thought that Snape was just suprised to see himself as a foe of one of his former allies. How does the foe glass work? does it show the people you know are enemies, or just enemies in general? If it shows just people that you know are against you, then you he might have been surprised that a Death Eater would consider him a foe or something. Most likely though, he probably didn't know that Moody was evil, and was surprised that he, Dumbledore, and McGonagal would show up in Moody's foe glass.
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mischa fan - Apr 23, 2003 4:41 pm (#197 of 216)
Olivia, I don't think that the foe glass shows people that you know are your enemies, or enemies in general, but people who are coming to do harm to you at a given moment. If it showed enemies you knew, or enemies in general who are near to you, then Harry would have shown up in the foe glass when he was in Moody's office.
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Pinky - Apr 23, 2003 5:25 pm (#198 of 216)
I don't see the foe glass as a mirror - so it wouldn't make any difference to a vampire. It started showing Snape, McGonagall and Dumbledore BEFORE they blasted down the door. So it wasn't showing their reflection at all.
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